Trusted Tips and Resources

Trusted Tips & Resources

Trusted REGINA VETERINARY Experts on the REGINA DIRECTORY share a Trusted Tip on anti -freeze

 

Here we share a helpful Trusted Tip on the REGINA DIRECTORY about the dangers of anti - Freeze and your pet

With the impending cold weather now and the corner, antifreeze poisoning is a concern. Most cases of antifreeze poisoning occur around the pet's own home and are usually due to improper storage or disposal. As a precaution, vehicle owners should practice safe usage, storage and disposal of antifreeze to help prevent accidental ingestion.

Ethylene glycol, the main ingredient in almost all major antifreeze brands, has an inviting aroma, a sweet flavor. Its appealing smell and taste often tempt animals and children to drink the highly poisonous substance. It only takes a few tablespoons of highly toxic antifreeze to seriously jeopardize an animal's life. Pet guardians need to know how to help keep antifreeze away from animals, as well as detect the early symptoms of antifreeze poisoning.

The following guidelines help pet owners avoid pet exposures to antifreeze.

 

  • Always clean up antifreeze spills immediately.
  • Check your car regularly for leaks. 
  • Always store antifreeze containers in clearly marked containers and in areas that are inaccessible to your pets.
  • Never allow your pets to have access to the area when you are draining antifreeze from your car.

 

Clinical signs can start within 1 hour of ingestion. They include: vomiting, wobbly gait (ataxia), depression within 1-3 hours, increased drinking, fine muscle tremors and panting. During the next 12-24 hours: the initial signs may progress to seizures or coma or the animal may temporarily improve yet then go into acute kidney failure.

If you suspect your pet has ingested antifreeze, contact your veterinarian immediately!

Check out the listings here in the Vets and Pets category on THE REGINA DIRECTORY directory of experts.

REGINA VETERINARY Experts on the REGINA DIRECTORY share a Trusted Tip on your Dog and the cold

Here we share a helpful Trusted Tip on the REGINA DIRECTORY about Cold weather and your pets

With recent dips in the outdoor temperature, your dog will need a little special attention to stay happy, warm and safe this winter.

Here are a few tips to help your dog during the cold months ahead:

- Ensure that your dog is or becomes acclimatized to the cold temperatures; frequent exposure to the outdoor temperature is recommended versus sporadic exposure.

- Check between your dog’s paws frequently since ice, snow and road salt often cause irritation and frostbite.

- Frostbite signs: pale, glossy or white skin on extremities such as ears, tails and footpads. You may need to limit your time outside depending on the temperature and breed of dog (varying haircoats result in different abilities to withstand temperatures).

- Consider dog specific clothing, such as boots and sweaters especially for shorthaired breeds.

- Antifreeze and its sweet taste is often appealing to dogs. Keep containers safely placed away and check your vehicle often for leaks.

 

Check out the listing here in the Vets and Pets category on THE REGINA DIRECTORY directory of experts.  Don't forget to keep your cats warm too!

Trusted Regina Pet Store share a Trusted Tip on RAW Food diets for Dogs and Cats

Feeding your Pet Dogs and Cats Raw Meat

 

In this video Dr. Karen Becker talks about raw meat diets for pets – why there’s nothing to fear and so much to gain by serving your dog or cat the food nature intended him to eat. Dr. Becker's Comments: Today I'd like to discuss the reason why dogs and cats can, and should, eat raw meat. This is one of the most frequent conversations I have with startled visitors to my home who say, 'My gosh! You feed your pets raw meat?' … as well as clients at my Natural Pet animal clinic who already feed or would like to feed their pets raw, but are getting an argument from their own veterinarians about raw food diets for dogs and cats. The whole debate about raw food doesn't make a lot of sense to me. Dogs and cats have consumed living, raw meats for thousands of years.

To this day barn cats catch and kill mice, and no one calls poison control. Farmers also don't call poison control when their dog finds a litter of baby bunnies and pops them in their mouth like little Tootsie Rolls. In these cases, no one thinks to induce vomiting or say, 'Oh my gosh! My pet just ate raw meat!' The truth is both cats and dogs are designed specifically to consume raw meat. Their bodies are adapted to process raw, living foods.

Fast Food is Bad for Pets, Too The first bags of commercial pet food entered the market about a hundred years ago. From a historical perspective, processed dog and cat food is a relatively new phenomenon. However, your pet's GI tract has not evolved in those hundred years to make good use of an entirely kibble-based diet – and it never will. Fortunately, the bodies of dogs and cats are amazingly resilient and therefore capable of handling foods that aren't biologically appropriate, like most dry pet foods. Unfortunately, this adaptability has led to a situation of 'dietary abuse' among the veterinary community.

Commercial pet foods – especially dry bagged foods – are so convenient the majority of vets recommend them to all their patients. Processed dog and cat food is convenient, inexpensive, and there's no preparation or cleanup required. You stash the bag in the pantry, scoop out a portion at meal time, drop it into your pet's food dish and you're done. Because commercial pet food has been so successfully marketed (dog and cat food products are a multimillion dollar industry, after all), and because pets' bodies are resilient and can survive, if not thrive on the stuff, we have been lulled into a sense of complacency about the food we feed our precious four-legged companions. Most veterinary students don't learn about species-appropriate pet diets in vet school. The only food discussed is processed, commercial pet formulas. The concept of feeding a living food diet is foreign to many vets. If a client mentions he feeds raw, the vet will ask, 'Why don't you just feed your cat regular cat food, for crying out loud? Why do you need to make food? Why do you need to feed living foods?'

It doesn't take much research to uncover the fact that dogs and cats are designed by nature to eat living foods – unprocessed, raw, nourishing foods. Feeding a commercial formula is a bit like deciding your child can be healthy on an exclusive diet of meal replacement bars. No real food, just meal replacement bars. A meal replacement bar is fine now and then, but no sane parent would ever consider raising a child on just those alone. Yet that's what we're doing when we feed our pets nothing but commercial, processed foods. Living foods in your pet's diet are necessary for successful overall immune and organ function.

 

Eliminating Parasites

It seems the biggest problem most people have with a raw meat diet revolves around parasites. Parasites – roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms – are passed up the food chain and wind up in the guts of animals. We don't feed guts to our pets! If you buy a commercially available raw food diet, you will not find guts in the formula because guts contain parasites. If you prepare a homemade raw diet for your dog or cat, you don't include guts. Do not feed the stomach and small and large intestines. Those are the parts of the prey we get rid of, because those are the parts that harbor parasites. Muscle meat – the part of the prey used to prepare raw food diets – is sterile except in rare instances when parasites escape the GI tract (guts) and travel there. Certain parasites, like toxoplasmosis, that get into muscle meat can make your pet sick, which is why you should freeze raw meats for three days before feeding them to your dog or cat. By freezing meats three days before serving (a lot like how sushi is handled), and by removing the guts of prey species, you can successfully avoid exposing your raw fed pet to parasites.

 

Salmonella and Your Pet

The second most frequently asked question I get about raw meat diets is, 'What about salmonella?' The most important thing to understand about salmonella or any other potentially pathogenic bacteria is that contamination absolutely does occur. It's a fact of life. Salmonella is the reason for most recalls of dry pet foods (and human foods as well). When a salmonella outbreak occurs, there has been contamination in the food chain. The word Salmonella is used to describe over 1,800 serovars (species) of gram-negative bacteria. This bacteria lives in many species of mammals. The most common bacteria riding around in your dog or cat is Salmonella typhimurium. I want to quote from an article titled Campylobacter and Salmonella-Associated Diarrhea in Dogs and Cats: When Do I Treat? It was written by Stanley L. Marks, BVSc, PhD, DACVIM (Internal Medicine, Oncology), DACVN, Davis, CA, for the Veterinary Information Network (VIN): "The clinical significance of bacteria such as clostridium and salmonella causing diarrhea or illness in dogs and cats is clouded by the existence of many of these organisms as normal constituents of the indigenous intestinal flora. The primary enteropathogenic bacteria most commonly incriminating in canine and feline diarrhea is Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter, and Salmonella. Veterinarians are faced with a quandary when attempting to diagnose small animals with suspected bacterial-associated diarrhea because the isolation rates of these pathogenic bacteria are similar in diarrheic and non-diarrheic animals, and because the incidence of bacterial-associated diarrhea is extremely variable. Salmonella species are commonly isolated from both healthy and hospitalized dogs and cats." What this is saying, in a nutshell, is dogs and cats naturally have some Salmonella in their GI tracts much of the time – it's not some unknown foreign invader but rather one their bodies are familiar with.

If you're familiar with reptiles, the situations are similar. Reptiles are known to naturally harbor Salmonella in their GI tracts. In an article written by Rhea V. Morgan DVM, DACVIM, DACVO for the VIN, the doctor asserts the following about illness resulting from salmonella: "Factors that increase the likelihood of clinical disease from Salmonella include the age of the animal, poor nutrition, the presence of cancer or neoplasia, and other concurrent diseases and stress, as well as the administration of antibiotics, chemotherapy or glucocorticoids [which are steroids]." The bottom line is potentially harmful bacteria reside in your pet's GI tract whether you feed raw foods or the processed stuff. In other words, your pet is already 'contaminated' with Salmonella. Dogs and cats are built to handle bacterial loads from food that would cause significant illness in you or me. Your pet's body is well equipped to deal with heavy doses of familiar and strange bacteria because nature built him to catch, kill and immediately consume his prey. Your dog's or cat's stomach is highly acidic, with a pH range of 1-2.5. Nothing much can survive that acidic environment – it exists to keep your pet safe from potentially contaminated raw meat and other consumables. In addition to the acid, dogs and cats also naturally produce a tremendous amount of bile. Bile is both anti-parasitic and anti-pathogenic. So if something potentially harmful isn't entirely neutralized by stomach acid, the bile is a secondary defense. And your pet's powerful pancreatic enzymes also help break down and digest food.

 

Keeping Your Pet's GI Tract in Good Shape

To help your pet's digestive system remain strong and resilient enough to handle a heavy bacterial load and to support overall immune function, there are several things you can do.

•Number one, minimize stress by feeding a species-appropriate diet, the kind your dog or cat is meant to eat. It's important to feed vegetarian food to vegetarian animals, and meat-based food to your carnivorous dog or cat.

•Minimize the drugs your pet takes, such as antibiotics. Reseed the gut during and after antibiotic therapy with a probiotic. It's also a good idea to maintain your dog or cat on a daily probiotic to balance the ratio of good to bad bacteria (gut flora).

•A good-quality digestive enzyme will help promote your dog's or cat's body to get the most out of the food you feed. Providing your favorite pooch or feline with a balanced, biologically sound diet, a healthy lifestyle, digestive enzymes and probiotics, will nourish your pet, support healthy immunologic function, and bring overall vibrancy to her body. This is in direct contrast to feeding a commercial formula of highly processed rendered byproducts, chemicals and grains – the typical mainstream pet food sold today.

The sooner you transition your dog or cat to the kind of diet she was designed to eat, the sooner she will be on her way to vibrant good health.

 

 

 

original article - http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2011/02/15/raw-meat-the-best-and-healthiest-diet-for-pet-cats-and-dogs.aspx

 

Trusted Regina Pet Store share a Trusted Tip on Table food and your Pets- is it the right thing?

 

'Table Food and Your Pets- is it the right thing to do? ’

 

 

Human, edible foods can be very healthy for your pets. Throw away the concept of “cat” food and “dog” food, and just think “food” — food that grows in the ground or comes from animal products. A whole generation of pet owners is afraid to feed anything but over processed rendered food to their pets. But there’s no way you can create abundant health in an animal by providing only the minimum nutrients it needs for survival.

Dogs and cats have a living food requirement, just like you do. The food you feed your pet should be biologically suited to meet your dog’s or cat’s needs. Dog and cat chow may be nutritionally “complete,” but it is akin to your drinking a meal replacement shake three times a day for the rest of your life … or giving them to your kids in lieu of fresh foods. Yet, many veterinarians will often recommend you feed your pets kibble or canned food for the rest of their lives. Some will go so far as to say that feeding your pet anything that doesn’t come from a bag or can will be harming your pet!

This is a paradigm problem, and one that can be very confusing for pet owners. In reality, there’s no way you can give your pet the food it needs to thrive if you do not feed it a biologically appropriate diet that includes a variety of fresh foods. In fact, a growing number of holistic-minded veterinarians state that processed pet food (kibbled and canned food) is the number one cause of illness and premature death in modern dogs and cats. So how did conventional veterinary nutrition positions get so skewed? Well, major dog and cat food manufacturers provide much of the veterinary nutrition information to veterinary students. It becomes engrained in many new vets’ minds that it’s wrong to feed pets “living” fresh foods.

This is a myth!

 

Your Pets NEED Living Food

Veterinarians  mostly tell you to never offer living foods to your pet. But your pets need living foods on a consistent basis to achieve optimal health. So, yes, you can and should offer your pets some of the very same foods that you enjoy. And since those foods are at a much higher grade nutritionally than typical dog or cat foods, they may be the healthiest foods your pets have ever consumed. As you know, I recommend you feed your dogs and cats an all raw, nutritionally balanced living food diet. In my opinion, the only viable excuse to not to feed your pets a species appropriate diet is cost. Feeding raw food cost more than dry food .However, raw fed animals have fewer health problems, which mean lower vet bills over a lifetime. If you cannot afford to feed your pet an all raw diet, don’t deny your pet’s access to living foods throughout the day, in the form of treats. Remember, treats (even really healthy treats) should not constitute more than 15 percent of your pet’s daily food intake. Berries are one of the best treats you can offer. Bite size and packed with antioxidants. Many cats enjoy zucchini and cantaloupe. . My favorite training treats for dogs include peas, raw nuts (remember, the only nuts you should never feed your pets are macadamia nuts). A salad without dressing, but with plenty of dark green leafy vegetables, is also good for your cats — your pets are chewing on your houseplants for a reason, after all. Avoid giving your carnivorous companions biologically inappropriate foods, including grains, such as oats, soy, millet, , wheat, or rice. Dogs and cats do not have a carbohydrate requirement and feeding your pets these pro-inflammatory foods creates unnecessary metabolic roadblocks to health. Furthermore, there are certainly some foods that are toxic to feed to dogs and cats such as grapes, raisins, macadamia nuts and onions. Never feed your pets these foods.

The Optimal Choice to Feed Your Pets

I highly recommend you give your dog or cat an opportunity to experience living raw foods like fruits and veggies as treats, and feed them a biologically appropriate, balanced raw diet the rest of the time. Remember, your pet is resilient and can eat a variety of suboptimal, metabolically stressful foods on occasion and be fine, but because it’s my goal to provide a diet that most closely fits your companion’s biological requirements, I don’t recommend a lifetime of kibble or other “dead” over-processed food. The goal is to provide a diet that mimics your pet’s biological nutritional requirements as closely as possible … in this case it means rethinking the “lifetime of dry food” or “canned food” theory. If you are unable or unwilling to feed your pet a species-appropriate, nutritionally balanced, raw food diet, then I strongly recommend you compromise with the next best choice: USDA-approved canned foods (and supplement with raw) My last choice would be a dry food (kibble), made from human-grade ingredients with little to no grains, and LOTS OF WATER. But no matter which option you choose, remember that you can treat your dog and cat to berries, leafy greens, raw nuts and many other fresh fruits, veggies and meats on a regular basis. I hope this insight will help you feel more confident offering foods and treats to your pets that are unadulterated and fresh. They deserve the same benefit of living foods that you get, and there’s no better way to start than by sharing some of these raw healthy foods with your dog or cat today.

We have always cooked for our pets, so always find it amazing, if not horrifying, that there really are pets who never get live food and who are doomed to eat the same dry food every day and that there really are pet owners who think that would be okay!! This myth created by the pet food industry and perpetuated by pet stores who just want to sell animals, regardless of whether the potential purchasers should be pet parents and then accepted by the “ME” generation, is another one of those practices like keeping your pets in a crate all day or all night, or shock collars, electric fences and collars with spikes etc that defy all common sense and really fall into a category of pet abuse or neglect, perhaps pet abuse light… but unacceptable pet parenting to be sure!! Would you want to eat the same packaged food everyday? Would you want to be locked in a cage all day or all night? Would you want to have to wait to go to the bathroom all night or most of the day, until some lets you out and says it is okay? Would you want to receive an electric shock when you tried to talk or walk across a boundary area… or have spikes dig into you? Would you do these things to your kids? When making decisions for your fur-babies, you should ask yourself, “Would I want to be treated this way? And would I make these choices for my human children?”, and then act accordingly!!

… Use common sense and compassion and “then go do the right thing!”.

 

 

 

 

 

Original Article; http://justonemorepet.wordpress.com/2009/11/11/veterinarian-dr-karen-becker-dispels-the-long-held-myth-that-table-food-is-bad-for-your-pets/

Categories

Previous Posts

ADDRESS

S & E Trusted Online Directories Inc
Trusted Licensee: Bonne Idée
TrustedRegina.com
1307 Ottawa Street
Regina, SK   S4R 1P3
Ph: 306.529.8558

GET THE APP

App Store Google Play
Follow us on Facebook Linked In Twitter YouTube RSS Feed
Abex
Abex
Stevies
Sabex
NEYA
Website hosting by Insight Hosting